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If you would like to have a document added, please email it to the Western Homelessness Networker:  sarah@wombat.org.au

Expenditure on health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2010-11
15th April 2013
  by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW)

This report presents estimates of health expenditure for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their non-Indigenous counterparts for 2010-11. The reports are produced every 2 years. This is the seventh report in the series.
In 2010-11, health expenditure for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people was estimated at $4,552 million, or 3.7% of Australia's total recurrent health expenditure. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population comprised 2.5% of the Australian population on 31 December 2010.

Per person health expenditure

In 2010-11, average health expenditure per Indigenous Australian was $7,995, compared with $5,437 per non-Indigenous Australian. This represents an Indigenous per person ratio of 1.47-that is, $1.47 was spent on health per Indigenous Australian for every $1.00 spent per non-Indigenous Australian.

This ratio (1.47) was an increase from 1.39 in 2008-09. Some of this increase may be due to improvements in the accuracy and quality of the estimates in this report.

Areas of health expenditure

In 2010-11, publicly provided services, such as public hospital and community health services, were the highest expenditure areas for the Indigenous population. For example, the average per person expenditure on public hospital services for Indigenous Australians ($3,631) was more than double that for non-Indigenous Australians ($1,683).

For health services that have greater out-of-pocket expenses, such as pharmaceutical and dental services, Indigenous expenditure is generally lower relative to the non-Indigenous population. For example, the average per person expenditure on dental services was $149 for Indigenous Australians, compared with $355 for non-Indigenous Australians.

Funding sources

The Australian Government (44.8%) and the state and territory governments (46.6%) combined funded 91.4% of the total health expenditure for Indigenous Australians in 2010-11. The non-government sector, which includes out-of-pocket payments by individuals, funded 8.6%.

For non-Indigenous Australians, the Australian Government (44.5%) and the state and territory governments (23.7%) funded 68.1% of the total health expenditure. Non-government sources and individuals funded the remaining 31.9%.

Health expenditure trends over time

Between 2008-09 and 2010-11, all government (Australian and state and territory governments) health expenditure on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people increased by $847 per person (in constant prices). This represented an average annual growth rate of 6.1%. The corresponding figure for non-Indigenous Australians was 2.6%. Expenditure per person for Indigenous Australians was higher in all areas of expenditure for 2010-11 compared with 2008-09.

CHFV's submission to Peter Shergold’s Community Service Sector Reform
15th April 2013
  by Community Housing Federation of Victoria

CHFV has prepared a submission commenting on the discussion paper produced, “Towards a more effective and sustainable community services system.” This is the over-arching reform process that has the potential to influence the outcomes of other processes such as the THM review and even the Housing Framework.

Bridging the divide:the experiences of low-income households excluded from the private rental sector
15th April 2013
  by AHURI

This project investigated forced exits from private rental accommodation in Australia. It sought to understand practitioner responses and systems of service integration to assist these people be reintegrated back into suitable accommodation.

Are Boarding Houses Disappearing? 2012
15th April 2013
  by Chris Chamberlain - Centre for Applied Social Research RMIT

In 2011, the ABS conducted a review of the methodology used to count people who live in housing that is below the minimum community standard. The results of the review suggested that there was an overestimation of homelessness in a number of categories including boarding houses, resulting in a reduction of individuals classified as living in boarding houses.

This report, funded by the Australian Government under the National Homelessness Research Agenda, investigates whether boarding houses are in fact disappearing as census data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) suggests. It fits into an ongoing academic and policy discussion regarding the enumeration of homelessness in Australia. The researcher contends that significantly larger numbers of people are experiencing tertiary homelessness through living in boarding houses than has been previously identified.

Download here (3849kb)
Responding to Children in Specialist Homelessness Services
15th April 2013
  by Christine Gibson:Australian Centre For Child Protection

Homeless people with children have complex needs and service providers who deal with them require a level of expertise in a wide range of issues. Training for these service providers can be difficult to provide, particularly for services operating in a rural or regional context, so online resources have been developed by a number of organisations to fill some gaps in knowledge.

This report, funded under the Australian Government’s National Homelessness Research Agenda, reviews two sets of online training materials that support service providers working with homeless children. It aims to establish whether having access to freely-available materials can increase the awareness, knowledge and confidence of workers in specialist homelessness services in regards to working with homeless children. The two packages are the Australian Catholic University’s Kids ‘R’ Central package (also titled Kids Central) and the United States National Center on Family Homelessness Understanding Traumatic Stress in Children booklet.

The researchers contacted 123 employees of specialist homelessness service providers who worked with children. Respondents were asked to rate their agreement with statements regarding homeless children’s needs, and their own skills in addressing these needs, both before and after reading the training materials. Respondents were also asked to identify any aspects of the resource they liked or found useful as well as what they did not like.

As only a very low percentage of respondents had actually read the training materials, the ability to draw conclusions from the quantitative results is limited. However, some useful conclusions may be drawn from the qualitative reflections.

Download here (2632kb)
Beyond Earn or Learn
15th April 2013
  by Natalie Lammas

For most young people who drop out, this is where their education ends, leaving them moving from one dead-end job to another, at risk of homelessness and addictions, wholly dependent on welfare payments for survival. And Gary’s story is all too common.

One-quarter of all young Australians aged 18 to 25 are neither learning nor earning. Keeping young people in school has been a high priority of 30 years of federal and state governments. For several reasons, the economic and social costs of early school leavers are significant. Young people who drop out of school are more likely to be unemployed, to live in poverty, to be sick or suffer mental health issues, to have dysfunctional relationships, to abuse drugs and alcohol and find themselves on the wrong side of the criminal justice system.

 

Youth Studies Australia 32(1): 3-4.

Whitelion Youth Programs
15th April 2013
  by Whitelion

Information flyer on Whitelion's Youth Programs

Whitelion Youth Programs Nomination Form
15th April 2013
  by Whitelion

Nomination form for Whitelion Youth Programs

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2010-11:state and territory findings
11th April 2013
  by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

Publicly funded alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia provide services to people seeking treatment for their own drug use and people seeking assistance for someone else’s drug use.

Main findings on alcohol and other drug treatment services in 2010–11, including information on clients, principal drugs of concern and treatment types, are available from Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2010–11: report on the National Minimum Data Set (AIHW 2012). This supplementary report presents key state and territory findings on the treatment episodes closed in 2010–11.

Download here (1336kb)
Think Child Think Family Survey report. 2010 (Aust)
11th April 2013
  by Christine Gibson and Kylie Morphett, Australian Centre for Child Protection, University of SA

In 2009 a national survey of specialist homelessness services was conducted to investigate how the needs of homeless children were being addressed.

A stratified sample of SAAP funded services was obtained and telephone interviews conducted with staff of participating organisations.

The interviews explored how the services identified and addressed the needs of children, what else they thought could be done to meet the needs of homeless children, issues around the prevention of family homelessness, and what they perceived as barriers and facilitators to working with other services in relation to children and their families.

Asking for Directions: Partnering with Youth to Build theEvidence Base for Homeless Youth Services
11th April 2013
  by Schweitzer et al., Pacific University

Each year it is estimated that almost 2 million American youth run away from home, are thrown out of their homes, or otherwise end up homeless. As concerning as those numbers are, the risks runaway and homeless youth are exposed to when they find themselves on the street are even more so.

Running away from home dramatically increases the risk of victimization, both physically and sexually. Moreover, youth living on the streets exhibit much higher health risks including higher rates of substance abuse, suicide attempts, sexually transmitted disease, pregnancy and death.

Because runaway and homeless youth find themselves lacking skills and resources necessary to fully engage in employment, they are left with few legally permissible options for survival.

North and West Homelessness Network March Forum on Rooming Houses
27th March 2013
  by NWHN

Flyer for NWHN March Forum on Rooming Houses, featuring keynote speaker Professor Chris Chamberlain (RMIT) who will be presenting his research paper Counting Boarding Houses: Reflections on Homelessness Research in Australia.

Agenda for North and West Homelessness Network March Forum on Rooming Houses
27th March 2013
  by NWHN

Agenda for NWHN March Forum on Rooming Houses, featuring keynote speaker Professor Chris Chamberlain (RMIT) who will be presenting his research paper Counting Boarding Houses: Reflections on Homelessness Research in Australia.

Wheels March Flyer - 27th March 2013
27th March 2013
  by Melbourne City Mission

Flyer for Melbourne City Mission's upcoming Wheels Program in North Fitzroy commmencing on 27th March 2013.

Wheels Program referral form - 27th March 2013
27th March 2013
  by Melbourne City Mission

Referral form for upcoming Wheels Program based in North Fitzroy commencing 27th March 2013

Poverty In Australia
25th March 2013
  by ACOSS

The Australian Council of Social Service has today released new figures showing 620, 600 people with disability in Australia are living below the conservative, internationally accepted poverty line used to measure financial hardship in wealthy countries.

Download here (1251kb)
Whitelion Young Womens Support Service
22nd March 2013
  by Whitelion

Whitelion Young Women’s Support Service for women aged 15 – 24 years who have been involved (or at risk of) with the youth justice and / or out of home care systems

Whitelion Young Mens Support Service
22nd March 2013
  by Whitelion

Whitelion Young Men’s Support Service - A new service just for young men aged 14 – 20 years who have been involved (or at risk of) with the youth justice and / or out of home care systems which provides one on one support and group activities

Defaulting on the Australian Dream: Does Full Time Work Guarantee Access to Housing?
18th March 2013
  by Australians for Affordable Housing

Australians for Affordable Housing have launched their report into the affordability of housing for workers in a number of occupations, Defaulting on the Australian dream. Their research shows that a full-time salary no longer guarantees access to affordable housing in Australia.

Download here (3796kb)
Addressing Housing Affordability in Australia: A 4 point plan for the next 5 years
18th March 2013
  by Australians for Affordable Housing

Across Australia hundreds of thousands are struggling to get, and keep, a roof over their heads, whether they are in private rental, home ownership or public housing. Our housing system, which used to support people to get affordable housing whatever their circumstances, is broken.

  • House prices have risen nearly 150 per cent over the past decade while earnings have increase by just over 50 per cent.
  • Rents have risen 49 per cent while household incomes have grown 20 per cent in the last five years.
  • Two out of five of the very lowest income rental households are in housing stress.
  • Almost 240,000 people are waiting for social housing across the country.

Australians for Affordable Housing are proposing a four point plan that will deliver 30,000 new affordable housing units each year and lift 250,000 households out of housing stress. This plan outlines a blueprint to address Australia's housing crisis and to ensure Australians have access to a housing system that works for everyone.

Download here (1442kb)
Housing Australia Factsheet
18th March 2013
  by Housing Australia

Rates of housing stress and homelessness are high, vacancy rates in the private rental market are low, and social housing waiting lists are long - these trends are all indicators of a crisis in our housing system, and they are documented in the Housing Australia Factsheet, which has been recently updated.

Meeting Housing Challenges - 2012 National Shelter Policy Priorities
18th March 2013
  by National Shelter

National Shelter believe it is critical that further government investment is made to increase the supply of affordable rental housing and social housing. They want the Commonwealth, and state and territory governments to commit to constructing an extra 200,000 dwellings by 2021. See their policy platform for the 2013 federal election below for more details.

Download here (1228kb)
SPLASH flyer for term two 2013
14th March 2013
  by Womens Health West

SPLASh (Safe Place for Laughter, Arts and Sharing) is a therapeutic creative arts group for children who have experienced family violence. In term two, it will be running it in Melton for kids age 6~9yrs.

Violence Against Women in Moreland: 2011-2012 Information and Facts
13th March 2013
  by Women's Health in the North and the Northern Integrated Family Violence Services

This fact sheet presents comparable statistics of family violence in the Local Government Areas (LGAs) of the Northern Metropolitan Region (NMR) obtained from Victoria Police records of reported incidents during 2011 -­ 2012. Many women experiencing family violence do not report this to the police; therefore, the LGA figures from Victoria  Police are likely to underestimate the extent of the problem. 

Violence Against Women in Hume: 2011-2012 Information and Facts
13th March 2013
  by Women's Health in the North and the Northern Integrated Family Violence Services

This fact sheet presents comparable statistics of family violence in the Local Government Areas (LGAs) of the Northern Metropolitan Region (NMR) obtained from Victoria Police records of reported incidents during 2011 -­ 2012. Many women experiencing family violence do not report this to the police; therefore, the LGA figures from Victoria  Police are likely to underestimate the extent of the problem. 

Violence Against Women in Darebin: 2011-2012 Information and Facts
13th March 2013
  by Women's Health in the North and the Northern Integrated Family Violence Services

 

This fact sheet presents comparable statistics of family violence in the Local Government Areas (LGAs) of the Northern Metropolitan Region (NMR) obtained from Victoria Police records of reported incidents during 2011 -­ 2012. Many women experiencing family violence do not report this to the police; therefore, the LGA figures from Victoria  Police are likely to underestimate the extent of the problem. 

 

Violence Against Women in Banyule: 2011-2012 Information and Facts
13th March 2013
  by Women's Health in the North and the Northern Integrated Family Violence Services

This fact sheet presents comparable statistics of family violence in the Local Government Areas (LGAs) of the Northern Metropolitan Region (NMR) obtained from Victoria Police records of reported incidents during 2011 -­ 2012. Many women experiencing family violence do not report this to the police; therefore, the LGA figures from Victoria  Police are likely to underestimate the extent of the problem. 

Violence Against Women in Nillumbik: 2011-2012 Information and Facts
13th March 2013
  by Women's Health in the North and the Northern Integrated Family Violence Services

This fact sheet presents comparable statistics of family violence in the Local Government Areas (LGAs) of the Northern Metropolitan Region (NMR) obtained from Victoria Police records of reported incidents during 2011 -­ 2012. Many women experiencing family violence do not report this to the police; therefore, the LGA figures from Victoria  Police are likely to underestimate the extent of the problem. 

Violence Against Women in Whittlesea: 2011-2012 Information and Facts
13th March 2013
  by Women's Health in the North and the Northern Integrated Family Violence Services

This fact sheet presents comparable statistics of family violence in the Local Government Areas (LGAs) of the Northern Metropolitan Region (NMR) obtained from Victoria Police records of reported incidents during 2011 -­ 2012. Many women experiencing family violence do not report this to the police; therefore, the LGA figures from Victoria  Police are likely to underestimate the extent of the problem. 

Violence Against Women in Yarra: 2011-2012 Information and Facts
13th March 2013
  by Women's Health in the North and the Northern Integrated Family Violence Services

This fact sheet presents comparable statistics of family violence in the Local Government Areas (LGAs) of the Northern Metropolitan Region (NMR) obtained from Victoria Police records of reported incidents during 2011 -­ 2012. Many women experiencing family violence do not report this to the police; therefore, the LGA figures from Victoria  Police are likely to underestimate the extent of the problem. 

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