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If you would like to have a document added, please email it to the Western Homelessness Networker:  sarah@wombat.org.au

Supporting Fathers Who Are Homeless
1st September 2012
  by Barker J, Kolar V, Mallett S, McArthur M, Saunders V, Australian Catholic University

Currently little is known about the experience of single fathers who are homeless and their families. Even less is known about their experience of homelessness services and how these services respond to their needs, particularly their needs in relation to their parenting role.

This mixed method study begins to address this research and knowledge gap by exploring the experiences of homeless fathers, with or without an active parenting role. It identifies the social, emotional and material consequences of their homeless experience for them and their relationship with their children. The study also examines how their identity and role as fathers impacts on their lives in general and their experiences of homelessness. Finally it examines how homelessness services currently support single fathers and identifies policy and service delivery changes that could result in improved outcomes for this largely invisible population.

This study, funded by the Australian Government under the National Homelessness Research Agenda 2009-13, increases what is known about the impact of homelessness on fathers and how their experiences of homelessness affect their parenting and relationship with their children. The findings of this study can inform policy, services and community organisations who work with homeless fathers, build service capacity to respond better to their needs, and lead to better outcomes for homeless fathers, their children and the community.

Link to document: http://homelessnessclearinghouse.govspace.gov.au/whats-new-3/supporting-fathers-who-are-homeless/

Locked out: Discrimination in the private rental market
30th August 2012
  by Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission.

Launched in National Homeless Persons’ Week, this new report from the Commission highlights the struggles vulnerable Victorians face when trying to access the private rental market. Based on a survey of 165 prospective tenants, Locked out: Discrimination in Victoria’s private rental market found that some people experience discrimination and stereotyping because of race or disability, or because they have children, making it difficult for them to secure a home.

The report reveals the significant impact on those continually rejected in their applications for private rental properties, and reveals most people are unlikely to make a complaint because they feel powerless and don’t know that they can.

The report identifies three key actions the Commission will undertake to address discrimination in the private rental market. These include: working with the real estate industry, landlords and Consumer Affairs Victoria to raise awareness of Victoria’s anti-discrimination laws; working with the industry to implement the positive duty to prevent discrimination from occurring; and distributing materials to raise awareness for tenants about their rights.

Link to document: http://www.humanrightscommission.vic.gov.au/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=1735:locked-out-discrimination-in-victorias-private-rental-market-aug-2012&Itemid=690

In the best interests of the child?
30th August 2012
  by Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission

The Commission’s report on the cost of primary education for dependents of international students and other visa holders has found that international students and other temporary visa holders are paying thousands of dollars in fees for their children to attend public schools in Victoria.

Launched last week, In the best interests of the child? was a result of consultations with the international student community, which identified the charging of school fees as an area of discrimination.

Australia has committed to free primary education for all children by ratifying the international Convention on the Rights of the Child, but legislation requires children of international students in Victoria to pay more than $7,000 per year.
The issue raises a gap between state and federal law, and highlights one of the difficulties faced by international students studying in Australia. In publishing this research, the Commission hopes to draw attention to the impact the policy has on international students, their families and the international education sector in Australia.

Link to document: http://www.humanrightscommission.vic.gov.au/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=1737:in-the-best-interests-of-the-child?-costs-of-primary-education-for-dependents-of-international-students-and-other-

Positioning Paper: No. 150: Downsizing amongst older Australians
29th August 2012
  by AHURI

Although it is popularly thought that older people prefer to downsize to smaller dwellings, the evidence suggests there is a reluctance to do so (Judd et al. 2010). This is partly because of the strong attachments to their existing home and the need for space for post-retirement activities important for health and wellbeing.

This study seeks to quantify the extent of downsizing, as well as the social, psychological and financial and policy drivers behind such moves.

The study will involve analysing ABS Census data, conducting a national survey of older people contemplating downsizing, interviewing 60 older people in three states and draw on findings from forums with policy makers.

Link to document: http://www.ahuri.edu.au/publications/projects/p70687/

Positioning Paper: No. 149: The Australian private rental sector: changes and challenges
29th August 2012
  by AHURI

This project responds to the need for more up-to-date information about the state of private rental markets and in particular the effects on households of long term private rental.

The research will examine how private rental housing is changing over time. In particular, this research addresses key knowledge gaps in relation to this tenure:

  • the location of private rental dwellings
  • types and quality of private rental dwellings
  • the extent of security and mobility within tenancies
  • the stability of household types in private rental.

The project will draw on ABS Census and Survey of Income and Housing data to get a picture of how private renters and their dwellings have changed over time. It will also look at mobility of private renters (especially vulnerable households such as singles or those with children) by using the Housing Income and Labour Dynamics Australia (HILDA) survey.

The project will have important policy implications for delivering housing assistance for private renters.

Link to document: http://www.ahuri.edu.au/publications/projects/p50683/

Communications Council best practice guide social media Code of Conduct
28th August 2012
  by The Communications Council

This Social Media Code of Conduct aims to provide specific guidance on best practice behaviour when working and operating within social media.The Code provides guidelines for social media undertaken for the purpose of personal or commercial use. The Code represents our current collective efforts to provide clear guidance in an evolving media channel. We welcome your feedback on the document to ensure we have comprehensive input from across the industry. The code has been prepared with thanks to Michele Havas of Tripod, Nic Chamberlain of 303Lowe and the Communications Council Digital Committee.

Link to document: http://www.communicationscouncil.org.au/downloads_tcc/2012/CC_Social%20Media%20Code%20of%20Conduct_FINAL.pdf

Children and their families: Best interests case practice model: Specialist practice resource
28th August 2012
  by Elly Robinson, Robyn Miller, Rhys Price-Robertson - Department of Human Services Victoria

The Specialist Practice Resources are a valuable tool for practitioners, but do not replace the Child Protection Practice Manual, which is a step-by-step operational tool to help with day-to-day procedures. They have been designed as a useful guide to help practitioners deal with the particularly sensitive issues and situations when working with vulnerable children and families.

This resource is published by the Victorian Government Department of Human Services in collaboration with the Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Link to document: http://www.dhs.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/720597/children-their-families-specialist-prctice-resource-2012.pdf

The influence of unstable housing on children’s wellbeing and development
23rd August 2012
  by Matthew Taylor and Ben Edwards - Australian Institute of Family Studies

Very little is understood about the influence of housing on children’s development in Australia. In this report, we begin to fill the gap in the Australian evidence by providing the first national data on the influences of unstable housing on children’s development, using data from Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). Specifically, we examine the association between residential mobility, unstable housing tenure and housing stress on children’s cognitive development and learning, and social- emotional functioning. Parental relationship breakdown often leads to unstable housing, and both of these are also key risk factors for homelessness, so we focus separately on the experiences of children living in separated and couple families.

Link to document: http://homelessnessclearinghouse.govspace.gov.au/files/2012/07/AIFS-Final-Report-the-influence-of-unstable-housing-on-children_s-wellbeing-and-development-Publi-3.pdf

Journeys Home: Longitudinal Study of Factors Affecting Housing Stability release of Wave 1 Report
21st August 2012
  by Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research

Journeys Home is the first large-scale longitudinal study of its type assessing income support recipients who are homeless, at risk of, or vulnerable to homelessness. The evidence will help the Government make better investments in homelessness support programs and be used for other policy development.

The report is based on a survey of 1,682 income support recipients across Australia. Some of the key findings from the Wave 1 Report are as follows:

  • Ninety per cent of participants had been homeless at some stage in their lives, and 51 per cent of participants had been homeless in the past six months.
  • The most common reason for first becoming homeless was family breakdown and/or conflict.
  • Only seven per cent reported mental illness and ten per cent substance abuse as major factors leading to their first homeless experience.
  • Seventy-one per cent of those homeless for a total of four years or more in their lifetime had been diagnosed with at least one of the five mental illnesses listed in the survey.
  • Half the participants first experienced homelessness while aged under 18 years and just under three quarters before they turned 25.
  • People who first experience homelessness at a young age are more likely to experience persistent homelessness.
  • A third of those who first experienced homelessness under the age of 15 spent a total of four years or more homelessness during their lifetimes.

Link to document: http://homelessnessclearinghouse.govspace.gov.au/whats-new-3/journeys-home-longitudinal-study-of-factors-affecting-housing-stability-release-of-wave-1-report/

Private Rental Booklet - a great resource from the Eastern Region Homelessness Network
20th August 2012
  by Eastern Homelessness Network

Private Rental Information Booklet that the Eastern Homelessness Network have developed. Feel free to print out and pass on to your clients or share with your colleagues!

This is a great resource that’s designed to cover all areas like:

  • What is a Lease?
  • Fortnightly Budget Planner
  • Where to find rentals?
  • Am I Blacklisted?
  • Presentation
  • Inspecting a Property
  • What to look for when renting a property
  • A property will be safer and more comfortable if it has:
  • Open For Inspections
  • Repairs and Maintenance
  • Applications
  • Rental Assistance
  • Bonds
  • Rent In Advance
  • Signing a Lease
  • Your Rights and Responsibilities
  • Connecting Utilities

The home study: comparing the priorities of multiply excluded homeless people and support agencies.
16th August 2012
  by Dwyer, P. and Bowpitt, G.

Homelessness is increasingly recognised as one facet of a wider experience of social exclusion. The term ‘multiple exclusion homelessness’ (MEH) has emerged as a shorthand term to describe homeless people who suffer deep social exclusion often due to a combination of on-going issues in their lives and non-engagement with, or exclusion from, effective contact with support services. Single, multiply excluded homeless adults are the particular focus of this study. People experiencing multiple exclusion homelessness characteristically combine a current, or recent (i.e. within the last 12 months), experience of homelessness (broadly defined to include rough sleeping, living in emergency or insecure accommodation), with one or more indicators of deep social exclusion, for example, chronic ill health (mental or physical), problematic substance use (drugs or alcohol), long-term unemployment, or an institutional background (prison, armed forces or time spent in local authority care in childhood). They routinely live in poverty and regularly lack supportive close or familial relationships. Multiply excluded homeless people (MEHP) have become the focus of policies that attempt to tackle the causes of their social exclusion.

Link to document: http://www.homelesspages.org.uk/node/24456

Will Paradigm Drift Stop Housing First from Ending Homelessness? (2012)
15th August 2012
  by Nicholas Pleace & Joanne Bretherton

Housing First is at the centre of policy responses to chronic homelessness in Finland, France, Ireland, the Netherlands and the USA. Services following a ‘Housing First’ approach have also appeared in Austria, Australia, Denmark, France, Hungary, the Netherlands, Japan, Portugal and the UK. Recent research has noted growing diversity in ‘Housing First’ services and that many services have ‘drifted’ significantly from the service design established by the Tsemberis ‘Pathways’ service. The authors argue that the Housing First movement is now at risk of losing focus.

Link to document: http://www.social-policy.org.uk/lincoln2012/Pleace%20P1.pdf

Two Can Live as Cheaply as One But Three’s a Crowd (2011)
15th August 2012
  by Christopher R. Bollinger; Cheti Nicolletti; & Sephen Pudney

In order to measure poverty, incomes must be equivelized across households of differing structure. Researchers typically assume specific returns to scale in household structure. This study utilizes panel data from subject reports of …financial wellbeing to estimate the relationship between household structure and overall financial wellbeing, controlling for income.

Link to document: http://www.econ2.jhu.edu/seminars/Fall2011/PovertyPaper3.pdf

2012 Australian Community Sector Survey: National Report ACOSS
13th August 2012
  by ACOSS

The Australian Community Sector Survey (ACSS) is the only annual national survey collecting data about the non-government, non-profit community services and welfare sector. This sector is a major provider of the community services that most of us rely on at some point in our lives, but which are particularly important to people on low incomes. The 2012 ACSS was conducted between April and June 2012 and covers the period from 1 July 2010 – 30 June 2011. A total of 665 agencies completed the survey, responding on issues relating to service provision, income and expenditure, and operational, policy, and workforce issues for the community services sector.

Link to document: http://www.acoss.org.au/images/uploads/ACOSS_ACSS2012_FINAL.pdf

Social Inclusion in Australia: How Australia is faring 2012: 2nd Edition
8th August 2012
  by Australian Social Inclusion Board

New Chair of the Australian Social Inclusion Board, Ms Lin Hatfield Dodds, released the second edition of How Australia is faring on 8 August 2012. This is the principal research report which tracks Australia’s progress against a range of social inclusion indicators.

Overall, Australia is doing well on many indicators which are significant to social inclusion. For example, more Australians are completing school; non-school qualification rates are increasing; Australia’s long-term unemployment rate is lower than comparable countries; the level of persistent family joblessness has declined; available housing for purchase by low-income groups has increased; and life expectancy is high and increasing.

However, there are still areas of concern. For example, 5% (or around 640,000) of working age Australians continue to experience multiple and entrenched disadvantage; we continue to have the 4th highest rate of children living in jobless families in the OECD; and income inequality has increased steadily since the mid-1990s.

Link to document: http://www.socialinclusion.gov.au/news/release-how-australia-faring-2012

National Social Housing Survey - State and Territory Results 2010
6th August 2012
  by by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

This report presents state and territory findings from the 2010 National Social Housing Survey of public housing and mainstream community housing tenants.

It shows that:

  • the majority of tenants are satisfied with the services of their housing provider
  • about 1 in 5 public housing tenants and 1 in 3 community housing tenants indicated they had been homeless at some time
  • about 1 in 5 households had at least one person who needed help with self-care, communication or body movement activities.

Link to document: http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737422570

Positioning Paper: No. 149 - The Australian private rental sector: changes and challenges
1st August 2012
  by AHURI

This project responds to the need for more up-to-date information about the state of private rental markets and in particular the effects on households of long term private rental.

The research will examine how private rental housing is changing over time. In particular, this research addresses key knowledge gaps in relation to this tenure:

  • the location of private rental dwellings
  • types and quality of private rental dwellings
  • the extent of security and mobility within tenancies
  • the stability of household types in private rental.

The project will draw on ABS Census and Survey of Income and Housing data to get a picture of how private renters and their dwellings have changed over time. It will also look at mobility of private renters (especially vulnerable households such as singles or those with children) by using the Housing Income and Labour Dynamics Australia (HILDA) survey.

The project will have important policy implications for delivering housing assistance for private renters.

http://www.ahuri.edu.au/publications/projects/p50683/

Download here (1311kb)
Positioning Paper: No. 148. Marginal rental housing and marginal renters: a typology for policy
1st August 2012
  by AHURI

This research project investigates the marginal rental housing market, which includes rooming houses and various kinds of caravan park accommodation. The project asks: What are the supply and demand trends in different geographical locations? What are the drivers of change in this market? And what are the housing policy implications? The research addresses these questions to provide a comprehensive analysis of the dynamics driving the use of various forms of marginal rental housing, culminating in a marginal rental typology.

http://www.ahuri.edu.au/publications/projects/p30699/

Victorian Public Housing Waiting and Transfer List - June 2012
31st July 2012
  by Victorian Department of Human Services

The Public Housing Waiting and Transfer List June 2012 provides the most recent quarterly indicative waiting list statistics by area. Also included here is the transfer list which includes people who are currently living in public housing but have applied to transfer to a new public property.

Waiting figures in these documents are estimates only. The figures can vary within a given quarter, depending on the number of people finding or applying for housing. The list may also include people who are in or have recently located suitable accommodation but have not yet notified the Office of Housing.

Link to document: http://www.dhs.vic.gov.au/about-the-department/documents-and-resources/research,-data-and-statistics/public-housing-waiting-and-transfer-list

ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM: RESPONDING TO ALCOHOL MISUSE AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
24th July 2012
  by DR ROCHELLE BRAAF - Senior Researcher, Australian Domestic and Family Violence Clearinghouse

The Clearinghouse produces two Issues Papers a year. These provide a detailed analysis of specific issues of concern to those working and researching in the field of domestic and family violence. This Issue Paper focusses on responses to alcohol misuage and Domestic Violence.

Link to document: http://www.adfvc.unsw.edu.au/PDF%20files/IssuesPaper_24.pdf

Supporting women who remain in violent relationships
24th July 2012
  by Gaby Marcus - Director, Australian Domestic & Family Violence Clearinghouse

In a domestic and family violence service system predicated on the view that the optimal outcome for victims is to separate from their abuser, women who separate from their abuser, women who remain with violent partners often experience significant barriers to support and assistance. This Thematic Review examines five key texts that challenge this conventional service response and encourage practitioners and policy makers to more realistically address issues for women living with violent partners.

Link to document: http://www.adfvc.unsw.edu.au/PDF%20files/Thematic%20Review_5.pdf

What do we know about dating violence among Australian adolescents?
24th July 2012
  by MEGAN SETY - Information and Research Officer, Australian Domestic & Family Violence Clearinghouse

Promoting healthy and respectful relationships among young people is a key focus of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children. The Personal Safety Survey, Australia and the Australian component of the  International Violence Against Women Survey have indicated that young women between the ages of eighteen and twenty four are at higher risk than other women of intimate partner violence. A growing body of international research, primarily from the United States (US), is raising awareness that the risk of  violence amongst adolescents may begin even earlier.

Link to document: http://www.adfvc.unsw.edu.au/PDF%20files/Thematic%20Review_4.pdf

NWHN and NW LASN respone to "Pathways to a Fair and Sustainable Social Housing System."
20th July 2012
  by NWHN ans NW LASN

The North West Homelessness Network (NWHN) and the North West Local Area Services Network (NW LASN) welcomes this opportunity to respond to the Victorian Government's discussion paper: "Pathways to a Fair and Sustainable Social Housing System." We hope that the feedback presented in this joint submission will add to a constructive discussion and provide ideas and recommendations for the way forward for social housing in Victoria.

In order to seek regional views and input into this submission we held a NW Regional Consultation on June 7th which was well attended by 48 staff, representing a cross section of NW Homelessness Service System (HSS) staff as well as our colleagues from allied and mainstream sectors.

National Housing Research Program Research Agenda 2013
10th July 2012
  by AHURI

AHURI has released its National Housing Research Program Research Agenda 2013 which provides direction for research that will build on AHURI’s housing evidence-base.

People in Improvised Dwellings, Tents and Sleepers Out
5th July 2012
  by Chris Chamberlain, Centre for Applied Social Research, RMIT University, June 2012

This research project was funded by the Australian Government under the 2009-13 National Homelessness Research Agenda. 

This report summarises information from the national project, Counting the Homeless 2006 by Chamberlain and MacKenzie. The national report was published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) in 2008, and reports on each state and territory were published by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare in 2009. 

The purpose of this report is to provide background information for the evaluation of Street to Home programs being undertaken in Australian capital cities.

The main data source for the Census analysis was the ABS Census of Population and Housing 2006. However, this data was supplemented by information from the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program (SAAP) National Data Collection and the third National Census of Homeless School Students. Chamberlain and MacKenzie also carried out telephone interviews with about 500 service providers and public officials across the country. Local informants were selected purposively, in order to check the reliability of Census data in particular communities and to understand more about what was happening on the ground. In most places, three to four people were interviewed.

This report begins by explaining how the 2006 Census count was carried out. Then it estimates the number of people in improvised dwellings (sheds, garages and cabins) and the number of people sleeping rough (public places, derelict buildings, tents, cars, etc.). Finally, the appendices summarise statistical information on homeless people in 2006, by state and territory.

To download the report click on the link below.

Keeping Off the streets: Effective Models of Intervention with People who are Sleeping Rough
5th July 2012
  by Jo Baulderstone, Flinders University of South Australia

This report, funded by the Australian Government under the 2009-13 National Homelessness Research Agenda, documents Street to Home (STH) services and models in South Australia (SA), Western Australia (WA) and the Northern Territory (NT), is the first of three reports in a longitudinal study that aims to fill the evidence gap on approaches to delivering, and the effectiveness of, services that are designed to respond to the needs of people sleeping rough. The research will be completed in late 2012. This research is focused on:

  • documenting service models of Street to Home services aimed at reducing rough sleeping across three jurisdictions in Australia;
  • identifying key characteristics of Street to Home services delivered in these jurisdictions;
  • identifying the contextual factors and service system attributes which support the attainment and maintenance of sustainable tenancies for people sleeping rough.

This first report is based on data collected in the first round of interviews with STH service staff in WA, SA and the NT. In the NT, government staff connected with funding and strategic development of the STH Program were also interviewed. Interviews with STH clients about their current situations, the services they accessed with the assistance of STH staff as well as their housing pathways, will be reported later in 2012.

Researchers found that STH initiatives in SA, WA and the NT differ from one another as well as from the Common Ground S2H model developed in the USA. The context within which all STH services operated was important and influenced the range or amount of assistance STH services were able to offer their clients. In general, there was little evidence of service capacity being bolstered by formal mechanisms and in the main all initiatives required a significant amount of liaison between staff and workers in other agencies.

To download the report click on the link below.

Street to Home in Australia: New Approaches to Ending Rough Sleeping in Brisbane and Sydney
5th July 2012
  by Andrew Jones and Cameron Parsell - Institute for Social Science Research, The University of Queensla

This report, funded by the Australian Government under the 2009-13 National Homelessness Research Agenda, examines the Service System Capacity of Brisbane’s Street to Home and Sydney’s Way2Home programs. ‘Service System Capacity’ refers to the resources available to the programs and their overall capacity to achieve their aims and objectives. Examining the resources and capacities of these two programs also provides a means to assess the extent to which these two Australian programs are consistent with, or differ from, the international programs and ideas on which they are based.

Both Brisbane’s Street to Home and Sydney’s Way2Home programs have been implemented as part of a broader objective of achieving government goals of halving overall homelessness by 2020 and realising measurable reductions in the numbers of people sleeping rough in their respective locations. The ‘street to home’ model was implemented in Australia, first in Adelaide in 2005, and then nationally as part of the National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness in 2009. Based on the successes attributed to the ‘street to home’ model in the United Kingdom (UK) and United States (US), many Australian policy makers see ‘street to home’ as an evidence-based approach to reducing homelessness. This evidence-based approach can be contrasted with traditional responses to people sleeping rough in Australia (Australian Government 2008). Thus the ‘street to home’ approach is positioned as addressing limitations within the dominant service system, whilst forming part of a targeted strategy to achieve measurable reductions in homelessness in Australia.

To download the report click on the link below.

Mapping services for rough sleepers in Hobart, Canberra and Melbourne
5th July 2012
  by Nicola Wylie and Guy Johnson - RMIT University

This research project was funded by the Australian Government under the 2009-13 National Homelessness Research Agenda.

Since the mid 1980s Australia has been one of the few western countries to develop a national response to homelessness. Starting with the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program (SAAP) and more recently with the Specialist Homelessness System (SHS), Australian policy responses have attempted to provide assistance to a broad range of people experiencing housing related problems.

When service systems expand and/or alter their focus service duplication is often a paramount concern to policy makers and service providers alike. In an environment where there are insufficient resources to meet demand it is crucial that new services avoid replicating existing service responses and add to the capacity of the existing system. Consequently, it is important that there is a clear understanding of the focus and capacity of newly funded services to ensure that they are capable of meeting the policy goals for which they were funded. Service mapping is one technique used by policy makers and policy analysts to understand service capacity and avoid the problem of service duplication.

The aim of this report is to map the number and capacity of services whose primary role is to assist chronically homeless rough sleepers in Hobart (Tasmania), Melbourne (Victoria) and Canberra (ACT).

To download the report click on the link below.

Why are special services needed to address Indigenous homelessness?
5th July 2012
  by Paul Memmott, Christina Birdsall-Jones and Kelly Greenop - The University of Queensland

This research report, funded by the Australian Government under the 2009-13 National Homelessness Research Agenda, addresses the question ‘why is it at times necessary to engage special service delivery responses to effectively address Indigenous homelessness?’ 

The authors speak to the concerns of government policy makers in this field generally as well as relevant administrators and non-government organisations (NGOs) engaged in designing programs and services for Aboriginal homeless and public place dwelling people.

They begin with a discussion of the policy context and relevance of the report including a discussion of recent trends in policy towards mainstreaming of services provided for Indigenous homeless people. An introductory section also contains a short historical contextualisation of Indigenous homelessness which aims to demonstrate how it is different to homelessness in other sectors of the community and introduces some of the culturally specific drivers as well as a demographic profile. Various identified historical camping lifestyles will provide a background to the reasons for the currency within Aboriginal living memory of the practice of camping which enables many contemporary Aboriginal people to engage in camping in public places when no other housing option is accessible.

The report contains an analysis of the recent empirical studies of Indigenous homeless people which brings forth some of the specific multiple causes, conditions and implications of Indigenous homelessness. This leads to the development of a set of homeless categories to define the specific conditions of Indigenous homelessness that the authors argue is more relevant and useful for policy makers and service practitioners.

The authors discuss Indigenous public place dwellers and develop a more nuanced understanding than previously reported in the published literature of this little understood phenomenon, based on fieldwork and studies over the past several decades, and illustrated with case study examples. This in turn is linked to the short discussion in Section 4 which outlines the risks faced by rough sleepers.

An analysis of conditions of housed people who are at risk of homelessness which the authors argue is a second category of homelessness that is often overlooked or under-reported in survey and census data and therefore by policy making is discussed.

The report also discusses terms such as ‘spiritual homelessness’, concerns about the nature of practice responses to Indigenous homelessness and public place dwelling, and briefly examines cross-cultural differences in the values underlying whether particular Aboriginal lifestyle behaviours that can be associated with homelessness, may or may not be legitimised.

To download the report click on the link below.

GOVERNMENT RESPONSE TO HOUSING THE HOMELESS
25th June 2012
  by Australian Government

GOVERNMENT RESPONSE - To the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Family, Community, Housing and Youth report: Housing the Homeless - Report on the Inquiry into Homelessness Legislation.

In the Australian Government’s White Paper on homelessness, The Road Home, the Government outlined its desire to introduce new homelessness legislation to ensure that people who are homeless receive quality services and adequate support.

The Government remains committed to introducing legislation and has welcomed the Committee’s recommendations and input.

The Government’s intention is to introduce this legislation as soon as possible following consultation on an exposure draft. The new legislation will replace the Supported Accommodation Assistance Act 1994 (Cth) (SAA Act), which set out important principles and has guided the Commonwealth’s response to homelessness in Australia since first legislated in 1985. The SAA Act was primarily a vehicle for providing funding to States and Territories to administer the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program (SAAP). New funding arrangements were introduced in 2009 under the federal financial relations framework, superseding the funding mechanism of the SAA Act.

To download the full document click on the link below.

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