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11th November 2019     SUPPORT THE #HOMELESSTRUTHS CAMPAIGN
by Western Homelessness Networker

On Thursday 10 October, World Homelessness Day, homelessness organisations from around Victoria released information about the top 5 most commonly held myths about homelessness through a series of social tiles which can be downloaded at www.vhn.org.au.

Addressing community misperceptions about homelessness is part of a broader campaign focussed on systemic solutions, such as investment in social housing.

You can support the campaign by:

1) Downloading the digital campaign kit and using the resources to smash the top 5 homeless myths by sending an email to all your friends and family

2) Using the #HomelessTruths hashtag on social media

3) Visiting www.vhn.org.au and downloading the social media tiles

4) Sharing #HomelessTruths with your local State / Federal MP and urge them to invest in social housing

5) Print out the five myths on put them on the wall at work (you can download the five A4 posters from the digital toolkit). more

11th November 2019     SUPPORT THE HOMELESSTRUTHS CAMPAIGN

On Thursday 10 October, World Homelessness Day, homelessness organisations from around Victoria launched a digital campaign called #HomelessTruths.

The campaign highlights the top 5 most commonly held myths about homelessness through a series of social tiles which can be downloaded at www.vhn.org.au.

Addressing community misperceptions about homelessness is part of a broader campaign focussed on systemic solutions, such as investment in social housing.

You can support the campaign by:

1) Downloading the digital campaign kit and using the resources to smash the top 5 homeless myths by sending an email to all your friends and family 

2) Using the #HomelessTruths hashtag on social media

3) Visiting www.vhn.org.au and downloading the social media tiles

4) Sharing #HomelessTruths with your local State / Federal MP and urge them to invest in social housing

5) Print out the five myths on put them on the wall at work (you can download the five A4 posters from the digital toolkit).  more

10th October 2019     SPEND 5 MINUTES SHARING HOMELESS TRUTHS ON WORLD HOMELESSNESS DAY, THURSDAY 10 OCTOBER
by Western Homelessness Networker

Discover #HomelessTruths this World Homelessness Day 2019

On Thursday 10 October, World Homelessness Day, homelessness organisations from around Victoria will be smashing myths through a digital campaign called #HomelessTruths.

The campaign highlights the top 5 most commonly held myths about homelessness through a series of social tiles which can be downloaded at www.vhn.org.au.

Addressing community misperceptions about homelessness is part of broader efforts focus on systemic solutions, such as investment in social housing.

You can support the campaign by:

1) Downloading the digital campaign kit and using the resources to smash the top 5 homeless myths by sending an email to all your friends and family 

2) Using the #HomelessTruths hashtag on social media

3) Visiting www.vhn.org.au and downloading the social media tiles

4) Sharing #HomelessTruths with your local State / Federal MP and urge them to invest in social housing

5) Print out the five myths on put them on the wall at work (you can download the five A4 posters from the digital toolkit). more

10th October 2019     SUPPORT THE HOMELESSTRUTHS CAMPAIGN
by Western Homelessness Networker

On Thursday 10 October, World Homelessness Day, homelessness organisations from around Victoria launched a digital campaign called #HomelessTruths.

The campaign highlights the top 5 most commonly held myths about homelessness through a series of social tiles which can be downloaded at www.vhn.org.au.

Addressing community misperceptions about homelessness is part of a broader campaign focussed on systemic solutions, such as investment in social housing.

You can support the campaign by:

1) Downloading the digital campaign kit and using the resources to smash the top 5 homeless myths by sending an email to all your friends and family (click here for an email template)

2) Using the #HomelessTruths hashtag on social media

3) Visiting www.vhn.org.au and downloading the social media tiles (see also attached)

4) Sharing #HomelessTruths with your local State / Federal MP and urge them to invest in social housing

5) Print out the five myths on put them on the wall at work (you can download the five A4 posters from the digital toolkit).

  more

10th October 2019     SPEND 5 MINUTES PROMOTING: WORLD HOMELESSNESS DAY, THURSDAY 10 OCTOBER - #HOMELESSTRUTHS
by Western Homelessness Networker

Discover #HomelessTruths this World Homelessness Day 2019

On Thursday 10 October, World Homelessness Day, homelessness organisations from around Victoria will be smashing myths through a digital campaign called #HomelessTruths.

The campaign highlights the top 5 most commonly held myths about homelessness through a series of social tiles which can be downloaded at www.vhn.org.au.

Addressing community misperceptions about homelessness is part of broader efforts focus on systemic solutions, such as investment in social housing.

You can support the campaign by:

1) Downloading the digital campaign kit and using the resources to smash the top 5 homeless myths by sending an email to all your friends and family 

2) Using the #HomelessTruths hashtag on social media

3) Visiting www.vhn.org.au and downloading the social media tiles

4) Sharing #HomelessTruths with your local State / Federal MP and urge them to invest in social housing

5) Print out the five myths on put them on the wall at work (you can download the five A4 posters from the digital toolkit).  more

8th October 2019     SPEND 5 MINUTES PROMOTING: WORLD HOMELESSNESS DAY, THURSDAY 10 OCTOBER - #HOMELESSTRUTHS
by Western Homelessness Networker

Discover #HomelessTruths this World Homelessness Day 2019

On Thursday 10 October, World Homelessness Day, homelessness organisations from around Victoria will be smashing myths through a digital campaign called #HomelessTruths.

The campaign highlights the top 5 most commonly held myths about homelessness through a series of social tiles which can be downloaded at www.vhn.org.au.

Addressing community misperceptions about homelessness is part of broader efforts focus on systemic solutions, such as investment in social housing.

You can support the campaign by:

1) Downloading the digital campaign kit and using the resources to smash the top 5 homeless myths by sending an email to all your friends and family 

2) Using the #HomelessTruths hashtag on social media

3) Visiting www.vhn.org.au and downloading the social media tiles

4) Sharing #HomelessTruths with your local State / Federal MP and urge them to invest in social housing

5) Print out the five myths on put them on the wall at work (you can download the five A4 posters from the digital toolkit).  more

8th October 2019     SPEND 5 MINUTES PROMOTING: WORLD HOMELESSNESS DAY, THURSDAY 10 OCTOBER
by Western Homelessness Networker

Discover #HomelessTruths this World Homelessness Day 2019

On Thursday 10 October, World Homelessness Day, homelessness organisations from around Victoria will be smashing myths through a digital campaign called #HomelessTruths.

The campaign highlights the top 5 most commonly held myths about homelessness through a series of social tiles which can be downloaded at www.vhn.org.au.

Addressing community misperceptions about homelessness is part of broader efforts focus on systemic solutions, such as investment in social housing.

You can support the campaign by:

1) Downloading the digital campaign kit and using the resources to smash the top 5 homeless myths by sending an email to all your friends and family 

2) Using the #HomelessTruths hashtag on social media

3) Visiting www.vhn.org.au and downloading the social media tiles

4) Sharing #HomelessTruths with your local State / Federal MP and urge them to invest in social housing

5) Print out the five myths on put them on the wall at work (you can download the five A4 posters from the digital toolkit).  more

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3rd June 2019     COURTNEY HERRON WAS NOT A STATISTIC, BUT A PERSON
by Melanie Raymond in The Age

Young people represent roughly half of all people facing homelessness in Australia. Courtney Herron, at 25, was one of them. Courtney, the young woman found dead in Royal Park on Saturday morning, was not a statistic, but a person, described with affection and love.

The average person seeking assistance for homelessness is most likely to be a 25- to 34-year-old woman, often with children in tow, and often escaping family violence.

But when they do seek help, it doesn’t happen. Every night half of all women across Australia who seek a bed in a crisis shelter are turned away from services, such is the crisis in housing. More than 80,000 Victorians are on the social housing waiting list.

Women who are sleeping rough face impossible choices. Fleeing conflict and abuse at home, they again face the risk of assault on the street or in the substandard and violent rooming houses and emergency accommodation to which they may be sent. The harsh experience of such places and low prospects of being offered secure housing means some believe the street is the safer option. Forming a new relationship on the street can mean they are protected from other men, but the man they are with can also be abusive and controlling.

Locking young people out of both affordable rent and the hope of home ownership, maintaining starvation-level Newstart payments, alongside a limited job market and access to jobs for youth in our poorer outer suburbs will continue to leave young people highly vulnerable to homelessness and related problems. Tonight the safety of thousands of Australians who are homeless will remain at risk while trying to sleep in the cold and just make it safely through another night.

Click here for the full article.  more

2nd June 2019     MORE NEEDS TO BE DONE FOR HOMELESS
by The Age

It’s simply not acceptable that homelessness is rising in a nation so prosperous. We don’t lack the wealth. We know which policies work best to simultaneously deal with homelessness and some of its key causes – particularly mental illness, family violence and substance misuse.

We know from international experience that the most cost-effective way to solve homelessness is to give the chronically homeless a home. We see the daily evidence of the suffering and despair caused by having no safe place to live. We know that this is not an abstract reality – these are people in our communities, families and localities.

The federal government made headway 10 years ago, fuelled by the $6.1 billion worth of affordable housing built as part of the economic stimulus under Kevin Rudd. Thousands of community housing units came on the market – but then the funding dried up, even as the demand escalated.

In the past 15 years, the proportion of homeless people living in capital cities has surged from 48 per cent to 63 per cent, according to analysis for the Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute.

Click here for the full article: https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/more-needs-to-be-done-for-homeless-20190531-p51td0.html more

2nd June 2019     NDIS AND HOMELESSNESS PRACTICE GUIDELINES
by DHHS

In response to the roll out of the NDIS in Victoria, the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has developed practice guidelines for specialist homelessness services to assist them in working with current or prospective NDIS participants who may be at risk of, or experiencing homelessness.

The practice guidelines outline the roles and responsibilities of homelessness services whose clients are either current or prospective NDIS participants. The guidelines were developed in consultation with the homelessness sector, NDIS providers and NDIA.

A copy of the practice guidelines is attached and will also be available via the DHHS Service Providers website:https://providers.dhhs.vic.gov.au/practice-guidelines-ndis-and-mainstream-services

The department is currently working on a one-page summary document of the guidelines which can be used as a quick reference guide for homelessness services. 

If you have any queries in relation to these practice guidelines, please contact Brittany Clark, Project Officer on 9096 1089 or brittany.clark@dhhs.vic.gov.au.

. more

2nd June 2019     NEW ZEALAND WELLBEING BUDGET PROMISES BILLIONS TO CARE FOR MOST VULNERABLE
by Eleanor Ainge Roy in The Guardian

Widespread praise for ‘world-first’ budget tackling mental illness, family violence and child poverty.

New Zealand’s Labour coalition government has unveiled its “world-first” wellbeing budget, to widespread praise from social agencies charged with looking after the country’s most vulnerable people.

The finance minister, Grant Robertson, unveiled billions for mental health services and child poverty as well as record investment in measures to tackle family violence.

lthough comparable countries such as the UK have begun to measure the national rate of wellbeing, New Zealand is the first western country to design its entire budget based on wellbeing priorities and instruct its ministries to design policies to improve wellbeing.

Click here for a link to the full article: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/may/30/new-zealand-wellbeing-budget-jacinda-ardern-unveils-billions-to-care-for-most-vulnerable more

2nd June 2019     HOMELESSNESS SOARS IN OUR BIGGEST CITIES, DRIVEN BY RISING INEQUALITY SINCE 2001
by The Conversation

Homelessness has increased greatly in Australian capital cities since 2001. Almost two-thirds of people experiencing homelessness are in these cities, with much of the growth associated with severely crowded dwellings and rough sleeping. 

Homelessness in major cities, especially severe crowding, has risen disproportionately in areas with a shortage of affordable private rental housing and higher median rents. Severe crowding is also strongly associated with weak labour markets and poorer areas with a high proportion of males. 

These are some of the key findings of Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute (AHURI) research released on 30 May. 

Click here for a link to the full article.  more

2nd June 2019     NOT JUST PERSONAL CHOICES: OLDER WOMEN AND HOMELESSNESS
by Felicity Reynolds in SBS Insight

All Australian States once had a commitment to ensuring that all citizens, regardless of income, had access to adequate affordable housing. The post war housing commission building booms in every State were testament to this commitment.

In recent decades, disinvestment in public housing has seen this option move from a dignified housing opportunity for those on low incomes to a largely unobtainable one. Reduced stock, tighter targeting and long waiting periods are the main culprits.

The current cohort of women aged over 65 grew up in a different Australia. An Australia where single women, even if paid enough, often couldn’t get a home loan. An Australia that until the 1970s insisted some women in some job categories resign their position upon marriage.

There was also no superannuation guarantee. It sounds ridiculous now, but all this (and more) very slowly created a lifetime of discriminatory disadvantage for those women. 

It should be troubling to us all that that too many of the women who cared for their elderly parents, the women who gave birth to the next generation and the women who worked their whole lives until an accident, trauma or illness made them unemployed, are now living ‘on the edge’ and unable to find appropriate permanent affordable housing. 

Click here for the full article.  more

2nd June 2019     ADVERTISEMENT FOR SINGLE BED IN A HALLWAY SHOWS JUST HOW DIRE AUSTRALIA’S HOUSING CRISIS HAS BECOME
by Cait Kelly in The New Daily

Australia’s housing crisis has again been thrown into the spotlight after an advertisement for a single bed in a hallway was posted on Gumtree.

The post advertised the single bed in a two-bedroom North Hobart house, which is already occupied by a couple and two boys, for $75 a week.

“We are looking for someone who is interested to stay in the hall and a single bed is there for use,” stated the advertisement, which has since been taken down.

Affordable housing advocates have warned that the ad is indicative of a larger housing crisis forcing people to live in overcrowded dwellings.

University of New South Wales’ industrial design program director Dr Christian Tietz said ads for overcrowded houses can be found across Australia.

It’s not just rooms that people are sharing either, Tenants Union of NSW senior policy adviser Leo Patterson Ross said.

“It’s called hot bedding, and you get the bed from 6am to 10pm and then you have to clear out,” he said. “They clean the sheets and then someone else comes in.”

Click here for the full article.  more

2nd June 2019     WHAT I'VE LEARNED ABOUT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IN MY YEAR REPORTING ON IT
by Jess Hill in The Guardian

When I started researching domestic violence last year, I thought I basically understood it. Some men, driven to distress by things such as unemployment, substance abuse or mental illness, were unable to control their anger, and took it out on the person they loved the most. We’ve all said and done things we’re not proud of in relationships – I thought domestic violence was just the extreme extension of that.

It took about two weeks for that notion to be demolished. Dozens of conversations with survivors and advocates revealed a very different reality, and understanding it was like being given the key to a secret room. Domestic violence is not driven by anger, first and foremost. It’s driven by a need for – and a sense of entitlement to – power and control.

It doesn’t make sense that even women who are smart and independent will stay with a man who treats them like dirt. It doesn’t make sense that even after fleeing, a woman is likely to return to that man six times on average – “it mustn’t be that bad”, people say. It doesn’t make sense that someone you know to be a good bloke could be going home to hold a knife to his wife’s throat. None of it makes sense.

But the more you learn about the nature of domestic violence, the more sense you can make of it. For me, a big penny-dropping moment was reading Trauma and Recovery, Judith Herman’s landmark book on understanding psychological trauma. In it, she equates the experiences of domestic violence victims to those of prisoners of war. In both situations, establishing control over the other person is achieved through the “systematic, repetitive infliction of psychological trauma” designed to instill fear and helplessness.

Click here for the full article: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/sep/11/most-people-dont-get-domestic-violence-because-it-doesnt-make-sense more

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